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Ep 3 - What is it Like Working with a Career Coach?















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Experienced Career Coach, Sara Reed shares what it’s really like to transition careers. According to Career Coach Sara Reed, with Moonstone Coaching and Consulting, creating a career coaching business takes longer than you think and is worth it. After 8 years in business, Sara still loves to lead her clients through the challenges of navigating changes in positions. Leaning into her prior experience as an HR recruiter and combining that with her interest in phycology, she offers a unique perspective on careers in general. She shares what it was like starting the business, what it is like helping clients today, and what she would consider as cool if it could be true 5 years from now!



 


Jaime White

This is the Believe Crew Podcast and the business is you being an entrepreneur, no matter what stage of the journey requires personal growth to sustain your success and create the ultimate life of abundance. I'm Jamie White, Founder of Believe Crew and your host join me as I interview coaches, entrepreneurs and authors that inspire us to go where they have gone. Be inspired today to grow and be the best you.


Jaime White

Hello, and welcome to today's episode. I am so excited to have Sarah Reed with us on the podcast today. She is the coach with Moonstone coaching and she helps people with career transitions. When I first met Sarah, I connected with her about how career is so much more about mindset than it is about resume. And I love digging in with Sarah about what are the things that actually matter when someone is looking at a career transition. And she's been in business for seven years. I love learning from coaches that are been doing the work and figuring out what it is that works for their clients and what's worked for them. So let's dig in and see what it is about her niche that makes her special. We have Sarah Reed here today. Tell us a little bit about your business and the business name.


Sara Reed

Well, thanks, Jamie, for having me, I'd love to tell you a little bit about myself in the business. I am the founder of Moonstone coaching and consulting. So I do career coaching. I work with folks typically in corporate America who are looking to most often make a change, right, they've been in their job for a long time. And they're a little freaked out by it, quite frankly, if I'm being honest, right? Like it scares them to make the change. And they're also unclear as to what they want to do next. So I help them work through getting clear on what they want to do next, helping them kind of calm those nerves and build their confidence up and then help them actually execute on the plan to get there.


Jaime White

So that's that's me. That's awesome. So when you say that they're a little nervous about it, how long have they probably been in their position so far?


Sara Reed

Oftentimes, a lot of my clients have been 20/25, you know, years. So it's, it's a long time, right. And the job market has changed so much in that timeframe. Even people who've been in their current job for five years, right that technology and COVID, change things and all sorts of things make kind of the process a bit different. So that can become a nerve racking for people. And a lot of people that I've worked with, they haven't had to interview so they they will be like I've been at this job and then my previous job I got because of Ryan, so they really haven't had to put themselves out out there and that traditional way, even even longer than the time they were in their current role.


Jaime White

Okay, so how did you end up getting into this? How did you wake up and decide I want to become a coach.


Sara Reed

Okay, so I promise this isn't going to be ridiculous. But it actually started when I was 17. So I know, right? I promise it won't take like forever to tell you this. But I was right out of high school, I was getting ready to go to college and needed a job in the summer. And so I went to a temp agency local to the area and happened to interview with the owner who was filling in for someone. And she must have liked me because she said would you want to work in our office? And I'm thinking that sounds a lot better than your regular temp assignment. Right. So they sent me on one assignment, I did well, and then I ended up working in their offices all through college. So I was kind of introduced to the staffing business at a really young age. I did temporary placement, I helped with resumes. This was in the days when you know, faxes, were on rolls of paper and things like that. It's real. It's real. But I was really young man. So that makes me feel good, right? So so I did that, right. And I was a psychology major when I went to school, so it was a nice parallel, that was kind of how I could see being able to use my degree in a corporate sense that I hadn't thought about,


Jaime White

I had no idea how closely psychology and human resources or even business management aligned like if you would have asked me, when I was thinking about picking a degree, what I would be interested in on the bottom of the list would have been something in psychology, but business management would have been at the top of the list. So how come I had no idea they were so closely aligned?


Sara Reed

No. And I found when I was in corporate for all those years, I used it more than I probably I ever expected to and I really appreciated that it was a different application. So that's that's that was the beginning of it. Right? Then I went and worked in Tilburg University in Philadelphia for a couple years and I had wanted to be a psychologist at that point in time, but I realized the academic setting was not for me and came back to this area for family reasons and got sucked back into the staffing firm because that's what that business does. And a company locally here by the name of Baird became my biggest client, their financial services firm and I really enjoyed placing folks for them. I you know, we had great relationships, good people. And I got to the point where I was like, okay, staffing is not for me, I don't like the headhunting. I like the recruiting aspect of that. But I don't like the headhunting. I don't like the commission. I don't like the force fit. So Baird approached me and asked me if I wanted to work for them. And I did. And I ended up being there for 14 years. So that's how I landed in HR. And again, it was a great complement to psychology, I was the only psychology major in the department. And I was like, that doesn't happen in HR was just really curious. Right. So I've really been on this path in this space since I was 17. And then I got burnt out a corporate, quite frankly. And I was like, and I'd always since I was on the bus, in like middle school, I was always the counselor, the coach, right, like, all my friends were coming to me, I kind of had this natural aptitude for it. So then you layer on my corporate experience and my degree, and it just, it just evolved, you know, I was known as kind of the go to person when I was at Baird. And oftentimes people came, whether they, they needed my expertise in recruiting or not, they knew I was a safe, safe space and someone to talk to. So that's where it kind of evolved from there. And, and I really enjoyed it. And it just seemed, when I decided I got to get out of corporate, it was the next evolution of how I could use all this experience I've had since I was 17. Right? Like it was helping people on the other side of the desk from HR, and helping them navigate their career through a different lens.


Jaime White

So when you started it, was it Moonstone coaching right out of the gate? And how did you see somebody? Or what, what was the inspiration,


Sara Reed

you mean, the career coaching or the name or what? Well, meaning they want to make. Okay, so I'll start with the name, I wanted to make sure people kind of got that I was a little left to center. And I mean that in a good way that I wasn't necessarily your traditional career coach, because oftentimes, career coaching is based off of, let's look, make your resume look fantastic. And let's get you that next job. And it's all about the money and like, like, and there was nothing wrong with that. But I am really focused on making sure people find the best move for them as a whole person, right? That it aligns with their values and their likes and preferences, and it aligns with their life, so that it all works together. So I am not traditional medicine. So I focus a little bit more on that kind of human piece of it not career piece, in making sure they realize who they are before they make that move, so that they find the best fit for themselves. So that's I wanted people to just know, off the bat, that and I'm into crystals and things like that. So that kind of gave an indication that if you resonate with the name, you're okay with something a little left to center. That was the


Jaime White

I love it. I love it.


Sara Reed

Well, that was that was the thought process. Okay, now I forgot your other part of your question. I'm sorry.


Jaime White

Well, you I think answered both of them a little bit. But I was curious if there was some, somebody that inspired you, where you realized it could be a thing, or you just, you know,


Sara Reed

we had coaches as a part of Baird, r ight. So we had executive coaches on site. So I knew it was was a possibility. So and this, you know, when I started at 17, I didn't know anything about coaching, it was hardly a thing right now, right time. But now, you know, you move through the corporate space for a long enough time. And executive coaching is very much on the forefront. And I knew I didn't want to be an executive coach, I wanted to work directly with that person, and help serve them that it's that one on one relationship without anyone else kind of mixed in, in that kind of can sometimes I've seen complicate that relationship.


Jaime White

I want to hear more about that. And I want to know approximately how many years ago this was that you started the business, then?


Sara Reed

Eight years,


Jaime White

it's been eight years, and you knew that you didn't want to do executive coaching? Because what was it that you were seeing? What was your experience with executive coaching up to that point?


Sara Reed

What I had seen as it got complicated, right? So the the executive coach is hired by the corporation, and it isn't as pure of a relationship, right? So the corporation is paying for that investment in that person, which is great, right? And I am pro that. However, I found that the then the coachee, right, does not have the same level of comfort with the coach because they know that corporation is involved in that relationship, right? So I have I do some executive coaching for clients that just happen to come my way that are they want someone who is just going to be their coach that they are paying directly that they know will get the honest God truth whether you stay in the organization or you go like I will give them you know, my perspective on that and my take and help them work through that.


Jaime White

So I think that's huge. And having your own personal investment in something, you know, at that point where you say, I'm interested in this to the point where I'll invest it in myself. And I love the idea of bosses investing in their employees. And yet there is there's a shift in the relationship. I think what you're saying speaks to what I've seen, and even if Even if we don't want to believe it's true, it's just hard to have their best interests at heart when you've got the company paying for it.


Sara Reed

And it can still be really useful and very helpful. But, you know, I found in doing this work, that often the things that hold people back are pretty personal, right and pretty vulnerable, that have nothing to do with their career, or nothing to do with their job. And that, that for a lot of people, they're not necessarily comfortable divulging that to a, I guess, a corporate coach, if that makes sense. Yeah.


Jaime White

So wouldn't you and I had talked a little bit before, you know, saying, hey, let's do an interview together, you had said that you really spend a lot of time with your clients on mindset. Is that really what you're speaking to right now? Like? It's the personal things that are getting in the way? So can you give an example or kind of like what you see common?


Sara Reed

Sure. Yeah, sure. Absolutely. So in the career space, right, the whole job, the whole goal is to land a new job. So what I found and I found this when I was hiring myself, right, on the corporate side of things, I would interview someone who looked great on paper, but I could tell they just didn't show up well in the interview, right. And, and I could see, I'm like, I think you're a good candidate. But I don't know if I'm going to take a risk on you. Because the person to the left and right of you showed up better. And what I mean by showing up, I mean, with confidence, clear on what they wanted, and things like that, right? So I always talk to my clients, you can have a great resume, and your your pitch can be wonderful. But if everything else behind that isn't aligned, and if you aren't clear on why you want this next role, or why you want to move into this space, those interviewers will note it right, like they, most recruiters have a sixth sense, right? Whether they recognize it or not, right, and they will catch that. And then that ends up impacting your career, and it could have nothing to do with your work, right? It could just be that you get, you know, freaked out and in selling yourself. And that's more of a thing that happened when you were young, right, that that impacted you. So those are the things that I find that that I work through my client with my clients on, beyond that tactical side of things, right. And I find that that's the best way I can serve them that again, I'd rather you see a decent resume and really work on making sure you feel good and confident about yourself and have this fabulous resume and be like, okay, I'm good for the interview wish.


Jaime White

Well, and impostor syndrome is a real thing. Sometimes. I mean, if we present ourselves, and we're not actually in alignment with what we're presenting, like we can put whatever we want on LinkedIn, did I mean it's free marketing? Yep. But the reality is you have impostor syndrome, and someone asks you about it, you're like, yeah,


Sara Reed

no, and it's interesting, you say that. So I have a lot of kinds of clients that come my way that already come with resumes that people have helped them with, they've hired someone to do that over the years and things like that. And I just the other day, I was with a client. And she's like, This isn't me. Right? Like, they get really freaked out by the language. And that's part of what we talk through. Right? I've done that with a number of clients. Two things can happen, right? So it's talking through, okay, yes, this is true. It's just in a sales sort of language, right? So it's just about the frame up not about the fact that it's not really you. And then the other thing that can happen is we tweak the language, so that they feel like it's a little bit more of them, right, that it feels a little bit more like okay, I, I can put myself behind it, because I see that a lot people that get resumes done, and then it doesn't feel like them. And then that actually messes with them more in the process, then, than anything else, if they would have used their old resume that wasn't done professionally. If that makes sense.


Jaime White

That is so interesting. And it totally makes sense. It's not something that I would have, you know, just thought but at the same time completely makes sense. What is the difference? If you could put your finger on it between the the job market today and the job seekers, you're the people you're coaching and what it was when you first started? Is there any difference? Or is everything just kind of the same ol same ol?


Sara Reed

Well, thank God, we don't have the roller fax machines anymore, that I literally, you know, because I was young, I was 17 they hired me for this stuff, I would cut the paper that was part of my job in the beginning was cutting the rolling and putting a bunch of phone books on top of it. So we would even them out. I know it sounds really good. So that doesn't have anymore. But um, I would say the shift to more remote work has made it great and more complicated in some ways, right? Because I think reality as well as perception it. That's not exactly the right way to say it, but I'll just go with it. Right. So reality is, is then you open the market up to more people in that job, right. So that that I find that freaking people out, right, like their perception is that I'm competing with so many more people. And yes, you are and yes, you aren't right. So I think that's evolved and that has changed. I think technology and the advent of applicant tracking systems and the technology that HR departments use to track people has really hurt the process as much as it streamline things right. So you went through the evolution that traditionally you had to walk in or mail or Email your resume right way back when. And so there was nothing that was automated around that. So that kept down your flow of information for what you could put out and what as well as a organization could handle right, the the influx of what they got. And then the advent of all this technology and things like LinkedIn and applicant tracking systems, now you've opened up the spigot, right? So the people are, it's very easy for them to apply. And it's very easy for this flood of resumes to come to a corporation. So it's forced this issue around companies having to use these filters. And I feel like it really limits their talent search, right, it really pairs down how they actually find the right people, it's, it puts it in this like box, right, as opposed to this kind of open marketplace. So my strategy for people is always yes, you have to use the technology, but the more you can connect with a human and and get that connection, so that a human can physically or email, like technically email your information to that person that increases your chances. So it's like you have to kind of work the system for both angles go directly for what you need to do. And that's, it's, it's gotten more complicated. Whereas in the past, you could just find that human right, right. And, and you didn't get instantaneous rejections, like you do now, which really takes people's moods and energy and right, like, like, oh, I submitted it, and five seconds later, I gotta no, right? And you don't know why you got to know, right. And that's the other thing that the, the lack of transparency is hard. And it's because of volume. And systems that are in place that are better and worse in the whole process. This


Jaime White

is really interesting stuff. To me, I don't know if it's interesting to everybody. But I came from an entrepreneurial background with a small business where I was the one that got the resumes, and I didn't have, you know, a technology filtering system. But I will say that the amount of resumes was starting to get more and more, and I got really good at scanning them. But at the same time, I also got to the point where I didn't even trust myself scanning them, because meeting the people in person and doing an interview with them was so different than the resume that I got to the point where I was almost like, let's just do interviews for all of them. It was so hard to know, yes, I did get better. But I didn't realize that in the corporate world there. I mean, I didn't think about it, but there are it would make complete sense that there would be these huge this huge influx of resumes, and how are they going to filter through that? So how does your


Sara Reed

and it's yeah, it's just like an organization, a sales organization that might use Salesforce to manage their right a CRM to manage their their pipelines and things like that. An HR department from a recruiting perspective has to have technology to for one run their their careers website, right, the applicant tracking serves to run their careers website, like that's the front page of that it's LinkedIn with their website, as well as the back end in managing the talent that's coming there.


Jaime White

Wow. Huge stuff. So I want to talk a little bit about your business. And you. And so when you first started in the business, and now you're eight years, was there, something that you found out that you didn't know? Like, when you and I when I had asked this question, or something similar early on, you said it takes longer than you think can you go back to the beginning?


Sara Reed

I'm glad it's consistent.


Jaime White

If you go back, what did that look like? And what did you think it was going to look like? And what was reality?


Sara Reed

I think and I've talked about this with other entrepreneurs, right? So I think that, you know, I was really well connected. I was in the corporate HR space, like since I was 17. Right? I am no longer 17, obviously, right? So I had this big network. And when I left, I had lots of support, and oh, I'll send people your way. And this will happen, and this will happen. And I think it took me a while to realize that that wasn't necessarily going to happen. And that not that they didn't mean it. Or they may tell someone but then that someone doesn't reach out to you, right. And I see that all the time, right, like, people send me referrals. And I would say I've got a 50/50 shot that that person will reach out to me. And I've had to learn that that's not about me, that's not like to take take it personally. It's more than it's an odds game. Right? So when you hear that someone's going to send your way you have to kind of lower your expectation say, Okay, maybe not, maybe maybe so in the beginning, I was naive and thought, oh, that's fabulous. Right? All these things are coming my way. Right? No, it doesn't work like that. That's how life works. Right? And so kind of learning that lesson and tampering those and managing those expectations to know that it's like a 50/50 shot right to in 10, you know, something along those lines and making sure you know, because what I did was I was counting on that emotionally and in some ways financially, right that that was going to happen. And it just wasn't the case. And I've talked about with other entrepreneurs in other spaces, that it just takes longer than you think. Right. Like there's lots of stories out there about how it was an instant success and all these things and that is the that's like winning the lottery ticket situation not necessarily the reality that happens for most newbie.


Jaime White

yeah, the anomaly not the norm. So I love that you're pointing out that the emotional part about it because, you know, when I was in real estate development, you know, you get almost I don't want to say an ego, but it's easy to be like, This is what we're building and you have a plan that you're showing everybody. And it's just very, like, look at this piece of land, we bought it like we're moving forward on it. And so there's things that you're doing that are very visible. And when you're starting something like a coaching business, I feel like things are not as visible, they're more emotional, and not that they're not in real estate development. But there's just a different element of like giving yourself space.


Sara Reed

So it's, you have a product, right, right that you can show, right? And so I'll give you this example. Right. So I worked for Baird, a well known known organization in this area, right, like, good reputation. So I had a great brand that I sold, so to speak as a recruiter, right? Like in the end, recruiting is a sales job about selling a person and selling them on the company and making sure you have a right match. And don't get me wrong, it's not about... It's more involved in that. But in the end, right? So when I went out on my own, I was like, Oh, I'm just selling me, right. And that's the thing with coaching, right? You are not, there is nothing to hide behind to feel more comfortable. And I say hide behind because it's really, it's an illusion, right? You're not really hiding behind it. But it gives you that comfort. It's like a security blanket, like I've got this brand in front of me, or I've got this building in front of me or this product in front of me that I can keep, like if I can channel my energy that way. So I don't freak myself out where as in coaching, its you.


Jaime White

it's raw, it's real!


Sara Reed

it is just you and it's very vulnerable. And it's a total like, like as if it's a product that can say, Oh, they just didn't like the product. It's not about me, right? Or oh, they didn't like the building or it wasn't in the right location, right? It's not about me. And coaching. They said no to you. Right? Right. And now granted, the reality. It's still not necessarily personal, but there's no barrier, there's nothing, nothing stopping that emotion from hitting your heart directly. So it is it's a whole different ballgame. When people come to me and say, hey, I want to be a coach. To me, that's what I talk about the emotional impact on you, and having to really manage that and have support to deal with that. Because I find that most people are confronted with that and the coaching.


Jaime White

I love that, I love that awareness. So when you first started, where your package is the same as what they are today, like were you like, Yep, I I know how many sessions I'm going to be able to coach people with.


Sara Reed

Its evolved, right? Like I did not charge enough at all in the beginning, right? Like in some might say I still don't, but I want to make it accessible and reasonable. Right. So and then in the Milwaukee marketplace is different than national. And, you know, 50% of my client base is in the Milwaukee market. So that that is probably one thing it was I've definitely tinkered with the number of sessions and things like that and found what it really takes to get through the things that I help my clients with. Right. And yeah, it's evolved, but it's the core of it hasn't changed as much as you might think. But I had a pretty good sense of what I needed to do. Because, you know, part of what I do is tactical, right. So it was, it's something I did in my former life. So I knew the reality of what that looks like more than some other coaches that might be helping in a different space that are starting out. So I had that baseline knowledge that helped me kind of say, Okay, here's what I think this needs to look like and how many sessions that needs to be and what components are a part of that.


Jaime White

And when you work with a client, typically, you're working with a new client. I mean, how often would you have repeat, like after your eight or 12 session package, then usually, primarily, you're finding new clients all the time. So you've kind of evolved and developed the marketing in a way that works for you. It's, you're saying it wasn't really as much referral initially as you thought or I'd hoped. But is it still quite a bit referral? And where are most of the leads coming from?


Sara Reed

It's probably 50/50, right? 50% referral, 50%, LinkedIn, Google's sort of internet sort of kind of my content that goes out there, right. So you know, I use the LinkedIn platform pretty heavily. I also hired when I could get to that point, my business I hired a marketing person to help me with all of that, because that is not my forte, I'm better at speaking than I am at writing. So I leverage someone else who has that ability.


Jaime White

Words matter when I say it with an extrovert. You know, sometimes we're surprised by what we have to say. But when you say it on social media or something, you can't just rework it all the time.


Sara Reed

Exactly. Yeah. So I and now I've had content out there for I started about a year in my business with the marketing person, so like seven years, right, so I've got and I did I'm on my own. But that was not my forte. I knew from the beginning that that that was something I needed to hire right in the beginning of my business, I really built it by person to person networking, because that's what my strength was. And that's what I knew. And I knew that wasn't going to be sustainable, but it's what I had, right, it was what I could manage. And then I added on that marketing component, hired that expertise. And that's really helped my just my presence online and all the SEO things and things like that of, you know, month after month of blogs and weekly content and things.


Jaime White

So how much really the business is networking based today?


Sara Reed

Not a lot, especially post COVID. Not a lot. Right, I found that in the beginning part of my networking I thought I would get more business from but in the end, it was more helped me build my community and my support system. Yeah. And I found, you know, some some partners now that are better referral sources or former clients right that come to me or say, hey, I need some help with my current job, and they hire me back again, and things like that. So that definitely plays into kind of how my clients flow into.


Jaime White

So today,when you're helping clients, what is it that your clients most depend on you for that you really love?


Sara Reed

The sanity check.


Jaime White

I love you.


Sara Reed

I like the job search is hard, like finding a job. I'm not gonna lie like it is not easy, right? Like, it is emotionally taxing. It is time consuming. It is it is not easy, right? And so that the real because of that, right? Because technology is complicated and instant rejections and things like that it is, you know, helping them stay grounded and centered and reminded that they're decent humans, and that this just isn't meant to be right. Like I would say, Yes, I have lots of expertise and can tell them why it's happening or what they should do, and things like that, like, tactically that I know, they probably find really valuable. And that's probably why they hired me, it's why I do this business, right? Like, I'm leveraging my expertise, and you get to get that right and working with me. But the thing I love is, is talking them off the ledge, right, like and helping them get back to them and grounded and centered and like, Okay, I got this right. And because it is it is such a roller coaster. And it's often you get the pressure of yourself that you're putting on yourself as well as your family around you that it's like, Oh, how's it going? Right? And questions and things like that. And it's not helpful, right? Like none of that right? For anybody. It's like right


Jaime White

after you have a kid then people ask you, are you ready for another one? You're like, Oh, my word. Give me a minute.


Sara Reed

Exactly that.


Jaime White

You're reminding me to have when my husband and I were first married. And he had moved to Wisconsin from Iowa. And he had always been offered jobs, or people referred him in the past. And so coming and actually looking for a job 30 days in, he was getting that defeated. You know, it's just a real thing. And then oh, yeah, an emotional roller coaster, no matter where you're at. Yeah.


Sara Reed

I always liken it to it's kind of like running a marathon without knowing where the water stations are, and not knowing how long that actual marathon is. Right? Like, you got no information, you're flying blind. And you have very, very little control like it so and I work with a lot of like, High Achiever control freaks, so it's like a nightmare. Like, it's like, oh my gosh, like, of c ourse, this is painful.


Jaime White

I love the analogy and keeping it real, you know, because that's this is normal, this is not about you, this is normal, normalizing it.


Sara Reed

It is not, it is not a reflection that you it's not about you stinking, right, right. Like it is just about process, right? Like, you know, you I always tell people you are collecting nos them, not more knows you collect, right, the more reject emails you collect, you're that much closer to your career.


Jaime White

Your a sales coach, career and sales. It's, that's one of the things actually that I've noticed. When you say I'm going to get some more education and go to college for a degree, one of the degrees that is not really well promoted, or if it exists, I don't know about it is sales or even in every degree sales training. And so I used to hire interior design interns for a furniture store that I was responsible for, and the designers, I wanted to play with colors, and they wanted to play behind the scenes. And I was like, we have actual clients here and you actually have to sell yourself. Did they give you any sales training? You know, it was like, No, well, unfortunately, in the real world, you're actually selling me on yourself right now. And if I hire you, you're going to be selling yourself to whatever clients you're going to be working with. And we don't just get to play with colors for fun.


Sara Reed

Yeah, it's a real gap. Right? I found the same thing to be honest. There's it's not exactly the same, but it reminds me of that. When I got to the HR department, right? I was the only psychology major there and so I would talk to them and I'm like, Oh, this is interesting. I didn't plan on being HR just kind of in HR. Just volved happened, right? Like none of them had any psychology classes, right? And I'm like, all you do is deal with people, right? Like, and we're talking about a services business, right? So different from manufacturing, right? So it's all about relationships and people. And so it's very people centric. And I'm like, you don't have any training in this space, right, like I had done. I've done crisis counseling and all sorts of things. Right. And the site degree on top of that, so I was really adept at dealing with people problems, right, and situations that I wasn't expecting. But there's was all still kind of old school 1950s focused around labor law, right. Yeah, like rules and regulations and policies. And HR is like that, much of that. And really, this much of the people sort of side of things


Jaime White

What you're saying is huge. And again, I didn't know either, you know, when you're looking at, what do I want to do for my future, and you look at the list of degrees that are option from, you know, offered at different colleges. You don't think oh, well, psychology and HR go together.


Sara Reed

But you know, if anyone said they wanted to be an HR, I would say, make sure you take some psychology classes or get a minor or something to help complement that, because it will really help you be successful in that space, and in that industry.


Jaime White

Substantially. Yeah, I love it. So if you knew that you couldn't fail? What would be super amazing if it could be true five years from now?


Sara Reed

That's a good question. I probably write a book. But it's less I'm going to be honest, it's less about failure. And I don't like to Write Right, like you've heard me say that. So it's more, it's, I'll be honest, it's less about failure, and more about like, Wow, that feels like a really huge,


Jaime White

that would be a growth opportunity for you. You're like, Yeah, someone said, recently, I heard that if you can talk about a subject for five hours, that you can write a book and I was like, okay, I can talk about something for five hours. And then I thought, well, maybe I'll use some of that new technology, you know, like Otter AI or something like that. And then just speak into a microphone, and hopefully, you know, Jasper, or one of those AI type things could turn it into a book.


Sara Reed

It's kind of like, when it's like, people start a business. They're like, Oh, I'm just gonna add water and stir. It's gonna be business. No.


Jaime White

Right? Oh, it's been so great to talk to you. And I love listening to everything from you know, your experience and how you started to how you're helping clients. And recognizing that we have to do something as coaches that really, it is about us being in a good place, like you said, because it's, we're not selling a different product that we can hide behind. So Exactly. Is there anything else that comes to mind that you'd love to share? When you think about someone that might be considering a career transition or considering becoming a coach?


Sara Reed

It's totally worth it, right? Like making that change, right? Like I've seen on both like my clients and making the change, like, you know, a teacher that's now in a marketing role, you know, those sorts of things. So I've worked in so many different spaces, seeing that evolution that like, Oh, I did it and I'm so much happier is is really rewarding. Think as far as a coach. It's the best job I've ever had, like this is this is by far what I was meant to do in my life. And I feel really grateful to be able to do it, and pretty honored to be able to help people in that way through a really vulnerable time. Right, like careers mean a lot to people and to be able to help them navigate that. People don't think about that being vulnerable, but it really is because so much of our core is wrapped up into our career and helping navigate that is really important.


Jaime White

that is awesome. I'm really glad I asked the question because I loved your thank you so much. It's been such a pleasure and a blessing to spend this time with you.


Sara Reed

It's been great to chat Jamie really appreciate the opportunity. It's been wonderful to talk with you

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